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Black News and News Makers in History: Ain't I a Woman Speech by Sojourner Truth

African American news from Pasadena - Black News and News Makers in History recognizes Sojourner Truth and her 'rights for all' speech, "Ain't I a Woman" this week in Black history.Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter. I think that 'twixt the negroes of the South and the women at the North, all talking about rights, the white men will be in a fix pretty soon. But what's all this here talking about?

That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain't I a woman?

Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain't I a woman?

I could work as much and eat as much as a man - when I could get it - and bear the lash as well! And ain't I a woman?

I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?

Then they talk about this thing in the head; what's this they call it? [member of audience whispers, "intellect"] That's it, honey. What's that got to do with women's rights or negroes' rights? If my cup won't hold but a pint, and yours holds a quart, wouldn't you be mean not to let me have my little half measure full?

Then that little man in black there, he says women can't have as much rights as men, 'cause Christ wasn't a woman! Where did your Christ come from? Where did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothing to do with Him.

If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back and get it right side up again! And now they is asking to do it, the men better let them.

Obliged to you for hearing me, and now old Sojourner ain't got nothing more to say.

Delivered in 1851 by Sojourner Truth at the Women's Convention in Akron, Ohio.

 
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Black News and News Makers in History

4/10/1894: George Washington Murray, farmer, teacher & politician, patents two farming machines. Read More.

4/11/1888: Edward Park Duplex elected Wheatland CA mayor. Believed to be first African American mayor of predominantly white U.S. town.

4/11/1948: Jackie Robinson signs professional baseball contract becoming first major leagues black player.

4/12/1913: Lionel Hampton, musician (recorded with Louis Armstrong, worked with Benny Goodman, & responsible for introducing vibraphone to jazz) & bandleader, born.

4/12/1966: Emmett Ashford becomes first Black Major League Baseball umpire.

4/12/1981: Joe Louis, world heavyweight boxing champion for nearly 12 years prior to 1949 retirement, dies.

4/12/1989: Sugar Ray Robinson, five-time world middleweight boxing championship winner & unbeaten welterweight champion, dies.

4/13/1669: Emmanuel, baptized by New York Lutheran congregation.

4/13/1891: Nella Larsen, short story writer under pseudonym Allen Simi (her married name backwards) & novelist, born.

4/13/1964: Sidney Poitier wins Best Actor Academy Award for Lilies of the Field role.

4/14/1775: First U.S. abolitionist society organized in Philadelphia.

4/15/1896: Booker T. Washington gains honorary degree from Harvard University. Read More.

4/15/1919: Elizabeth Catlett, lithographer, painter & sculptor, born. Read More.

4/16/1862: President Abraham Lincoln signs bill ending slavery in District of Columbia—nine months before he issues Emancipation Proclamation.

4/16/1994: Ralph Ellison, "Invisible Man" author, dies.

 

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